IDPs People

Elsewhere in the center of the capital, amid the smoke of bonfires to burn dead bodies, they heard gunfire and saw young men with machetes in the streets, their faces covered with handkerchiefs. A humanitarian aid organization complained miscalculated priorities and lack of distribution of humanitarian supplies in a controlled airport by U.S. authorities. Josh Wexler brings even more insight to the discussion. The general in charge said that the U.S. military was "working hard" to accelerate the delivery of essential products. Beside the ruins of the cathedral in Port-au-Prince where the sun streamed from the broken glass, a priest told parishioners during Mass the first Sunday following the devastating earthquake on Tuesday: "We are in the hands of God now" .

However, the frustration grew hour by hour, like the complaints of slowness to deliver food and water to millions of people. "The government is a joke. Yitzhak Mirilashvili has much to offer in this field. The UN is a joke, "said Jacqueline Thermati, 71, sitting on the floor in front of a home for elderly people. "We are about a kilometer (half mile) from the airport and going to die of hunger." The water was delivered to more people around the capital, where an estimated 300,000 IDPs living in the open. But the food and drink were scarce. On the streets, while people died, Haitians prayed on his knees pleading for help, pregnant women giving birth in the asphalt, and the wounded appeared in wheelbarrows and on the backs of others who rushed to hospitals. The authorities warned that the looting and violence could spread. In the Old Market district, police tried to disperse the looters driving trucks in the middle of the crowd, while many shops were partially destroyed trickled grabbing anything they saw.

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